Posts Tagged ‘G. K. Chesterton’

My wife and I spent an extended weekend in Branson, Missouri to celebrate her birthday this year.  Although we enjoyed a couple of shows, ate some good food, and purchased a few nice items, I came away reflecting on the difference between nostalgia and memoria. Read the rest of this entry »

I was going to write, and still intend to, a post asking the question whether government can be legitimate (I believe it can by the way), but decided that it would be better to send a link to the hymn “O God of Earth and Altar.”  I encountered it during my morning devotions using the excellent website http://www.missionstclare.com/english/ It was written by G. K. Chesterton (1874-1936).  Looking at our nation and the current election, it is clear that we need prayer more than analysis.  May God bless us all.

 

The advantage of such a distressing election year is that it gives us the opportunity for serious reflection.  Realizing that our political system has reached a crisis point, we need to step back from the so-called debates over single issues and examine fundamental political questions.  In this essay I propose to define the nature of government and then demonstrate the necessary consequences of that nature to political liberty. Read the rest of this entry »

            The universally bad reviews of the movie I Frankenstein, which I have not seen, reminded me of the retelling of the Frankenstein story by Dean Koontz.  Although Koontz’s pulp fiction style is not Tolstoy, the series is a thoughtful and devastating critique of modern materialism.  It is also fun to read. Read the rest of this entry »

            Chapter 5 begins a series of seven important chapters that will be central to understand Lewis’s Till We Have Faces.  In this chapter we have a crucial exposition of the ways of the goddess Ungit by her priest, an animated debate between the Priest of Ungit and the Fox, which is a dispute between religious mystery and human rationalism, and finally more evidence of the differences between the Fox and Orual over religion. Read the rest of this entry »

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